thenextweb:

A site called “We Know What You’re Doing“, created by Callum Haywood, aggregates public Facebook and Foursquare data based on the following: - Who wants to get fired? - Who’s hungover? - Who’s taking drugs? - Who’s got a new phone number? Yep. Haywood calls this an “experiment” and is letting you know that you might be sharing things that are way too personal. (via This Site Knows What You’re Doing)

thenextweb:

A site called “We Know What You’re Doing“, created by Callum Haywood, aggregates public Facebook and Foursquare data based on the following: - Who wants to get fired? - Who’s hungover? - Who’s taking drugs? - Who’s got a new phone number? Yep. Haywood calls this an “experiment” and is letting you know that you might be sharing things that are way too personal. (via This Site Knows What You’re Doing)

futuristgerd:

Verna, “Marketers who are savvy about how to use Facebook are focusing … on the site’s strength as a content portal, its viral power and its ability to deliver qualitative and quantitative feedback on brand campaigns.” (via Facebook, Twitter Help Publishers Find Their Audience - eMarketer)

futuristgerd:

Verna, “Marketers who are savvy about how to use Facebook are focusing … on the site’s strength as a content portal, its viral power and its ability to deliver qualitative and quantitative feedback on brand campaigns.” (via Facebook, Twitter Help Publishers Find Their Audience - eMarketer)

theatlantic:

When Trashing Your Boss on Facebook Suddenly Becomes Very Public

Let me give you this hypothetical about privacy. You and a friend walk into a public subway station having a conversation about how much you hate your boss. Someone happens to be recording every word spoken listening for the search string “hate my boss” while running facial recognition software to figure out who you are. This information is then being posted in another public location for anyone and everyone to see. Would that be OK?
My intuition is that almost everyone reading this post would say no. And yet, that is precisely what the website, WeKnowWhatYoureDoing.com is doing with public Facebook updates. The site scrapes public Facebook updates and searches for people saying “hate my boss,” discussing doing drugs, giving out their phone numbers, or complaining about being hungover. It then handily formats them for broader consumption.
Read more. [Image: weknowwhatyouredoing.com]

theatlantic:

When Trashing Your Boss on Facebook Suddenly Becomes Very Public

Let me give you this hypothetical about privacy. You and a friend walk into a public subway station having a conversation about how much you hate your boss. Someone happens to be recording every word spoken listening for the search string “hate my boss” while running facial recognition software to figure out who you are. This information is then being posted in another public location for anyone and everyone to see. Would that be OK?

My intuition is that almost everyone reading this post would say no. And yet, that is precisely what the website, WeKnowWhatYoureDoing.com is doing with public Facebook updates. The site scrapes public Facebook updates and searches for people saying “hate my boss,” discussing doing drugs, giving out their phone numbers, or complaining about being hungover. It then handily formats them for broader consumption.

Read more. [Image: weknowwhatyouredoing.com]

wildcat2030:

‘Mind uploading’ featured in academic journal special issue for first time

The Special Issue on Mind Uploading (Vol. 4, issue 1, June 2012) of the International Journal of Machine Consciousness, just released, “constitutes a significant milestone in the history of mind uploading research: the first-ever collection of scientific and philosophical papers on the theme of mind uploading,” as Ben Goertzel and Matthew Ikle’ note in the Introduction to this issue. “Mind uploading” is an informal term that refers to transferring the mental contents from a human brain into a different substrate, such as a digital, analog, or quantum computer. It’s also known as “whole brain emulation” and “substrate-independent minds.” Serious mind uploading researchers have emerged recently, taking this seemingly science-fictional notion seriously and pursuing it via experimental and theoretical research programs, Goertzel and Ilke’ note. (via ‘Mind uploading’ featured in academic journal special issue for first time | KurzweilAI)

wildcat2030:

‘Mind uploading’ featured in academic journal special issue for first time



The Special Issue on Mind Uploading (Vol. 4, issue 1, June 2012) of the International Journal of Machine Consciousness, just released, “constitutes a significant milestone in the history of mind uploading research: the first-ever collection of scientific and philosophical papers on the theme of mind uploading,” as Ben Goertzel and Matthew Ikle’ note in the Introduction to this issue. “Mind uploading” is an informal term that refers to transferring the mental contents from a human brain into a different substrate, such as a digital, analog, or quantum computer. It’s also known as “whole brain emulation” and “substrate-independent minds.” Serious mind uploading researchers have emerged recently, taking this seemingly science-fictional notion seriously and pursuing it via experimental and theoretical research programs, Goertzel and Ilke’ note. (via ‘Mind uploading’ featured in academic journal special issue for first time | KurzweilAI)

infoneer-pulse:

For most of us, our cell phones are now a convenient way to get online while we’re on the go (or on the couch). According to a new report by the Pew Internet & American Life project. However, 17% of U.S. adult cell phone owners now go online using their phones more than their desktops, laptops or tablets. That’s the number for all cell phone owners in the U.S, including those with feature phones. Just looking at those who already use their phones to go online (55% of all cell phone owners), a whopping 31% now say they mostly use their phones to go online.

» via TechCrunch

mrgan:

CUPERTINO, California—June 27, 2012—Apple today announced a major rebranding of their entire product catalog, dropping the “i” prefix in the names of products such as iTunes, iLife, and iWork. These will now be known as Tunes, Life, and Work.

“Simplifying complex technology has always been one of…

When the country elected Barack Obama just four years ago, Twitter was a fledgling startup. During the campaign, Obama overtook Kevin Rose as the most followed person on Twitter, passing him at 56,482 followers.

Five years ago, according to Pew, less than half of Americans used email daily; less than a third used a search engine.

YouTube was founded in 2005 and Facebook in 2004 — and it would be a while after that until they became such integral parts of our day-to-day Internet experience.

Today nearly half of Americans own a smartphone. The iPhone is five years old.

Our lives look a lot more interesting when they’re filtered through the sexy Facebook interface. We star in our own movies, we photograph ourselves incessantly, we click the mouse and a machine confirms our sense of mastery. And, since our technology is really just an extension of ourselves, we don’t have to have contempt for its manipulability in the way we might with actual people. It’s all one big endless loop. We like the mirror and the mirror likes us. To friend a person is merely to include the person in our private hall of flattering mirrors.

Source: Jonathan Franzen, “Liking Is for Cowards. Go for What Hurts,” in the New York Times. (via barretta)

cloudsabove:

Kuala Lumpur has some interesting ways of display advertising that utilities the space efficiently.

lifehappensonlyonce:

Ads Around the Globe:

“If you’re not an organ donor when you die, you take someone else with you”.

Country: South Africa

Brand: Organ Donor Foundation

Agency: Lowe

Creative Director: Brendan Hoffman, Lisa Hodgskiss & Dane Alexander